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Pakistan (تاریخ پاکستان) was home to one of the world's major civilizations,[1][2][3][4] the Indus Valley Civilisation. The trade routes which traverse the Indus Valley linking Central Asia, the Indian subcontinent and the Orient have attracted people from as far as Greece and Mongolia[5] and countless imperial powers, the last being the British Empire.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Possehl, G. L. (October 1990). "Revolution in the Urban Revolution: The Emergence of Indus Urbanization". Annual Review of Anthropology 19 (1): 261–282. doi:10.1146/annurev.an.19.100190.001401. Retrieved on 6 May 2007.</cite>  </li>
  2. <cite style="font-style:normal" class="book" id="CITEREFKenoyerKimberley_Heuston2005">Kenoyer, Jonathan Mark; Kimberley Heuston (May 2005). The Ancient South Asian World. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-517422-9. http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/HistoryWorld/Ancient/Other/~~/dmlldz11c2EmY2k9OTc4MDE5NTE3NDIyOQ==.</cite>  </li>
  3. <cite style="font-style:normal" class="web" id="CITEREF">"Palaeolithic and Pleistocene of Pakistan". Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield. http://www.shef.ac.uk/archaeology/research/pakistan. Retrieved on 1 December 2007.</cite>  </li>
  4. <cite style="font-style:normal" class="book" id="CITEREFMurray1999">Murray, Tim (1999). Time and archaeology. London; New York: Routledge. p. 84. ISBN 978-0-415-11762-3. https://books.google.com/?id=k3z9iXo_Uq8C&pg=PP3&dq=%22Time+and+Archaeology%22.</cite>  </li>
  5. <cite style="font-style:normal" class="book" id="CITEREFYoungSusan_L._Stetler1987">Young, Margaret Walsh; Susan L. Stetler (November 1987). Cities of the World, 3rd Edition, Vol. 4, Page 439. Gale Research. ISBN 081032542X.</cite>  </li></ol>
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